WHAT IS THE RIGHT MARKETING LANGUAGE TO USE?

“…Purchases are emotional. No matter how inconsequential of a purchase decision you deem it — you’re still choosing it based on emotion. Even commodities.”   

— Margo Aaron, psychologist and marketing writer (Medium.com) 

There are two little blobs of gray matter nestling neatly underneath the middle of your brain. They take their name — amygdala — from the Greek word for the tasty nut responsible for amaretto and Almond Joy bars due to its resemblance to said snack food. 

The amygdala’s job is to learn and store information about emotional events. Feeling afraid is great for avoiding danger, but these little nuggets also keep track of emotions attached to reward.

Now think about how you market your products or services to people whose amygdalae are awake and on duty. What’s going to make your marketing message connect with the emotional memory of your audience? Features? Colors? The process of production? Components? Perhaps. But what really hits your audience’s reward system is: 

How your product or service solves their problem

Aim your marketing language at people’s’ pain points — challenges that if solved in a reliable way, would trigger the relief and gratification that will make your audience happy while locking in a amygdala-curated memory about the experience

Marketing language sells solutions, not products.

Focus your message directly to the people who are actively triggered by the pain points for which you have solutions. You are not marketing to “everyone.” Market to your most likely customer and others will ultimately follow.

In other words, sell to a high-percentage subset of everyone. Anyone can buy from you. However, only a fraction know you, trust you, and are ready to have their problem solved by you.

These directives are part of the larger discipline of customer-centered marketing. It takes some research and study, but uncovering and addressing pain points, fears, barriers and other motivating factors will bring you better, more qualified leads